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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 21:33 
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Association of Chief Police Officer of England, Wales & Northern Ireland

Motorcycle Enforcement Strategy For England, Wales & Northern Ireland

Status: This Strategy document is published by the Motorcycle Casualty Reduction Working Group and has been approved by the Head of the Road Policing Business Area. It has been audited in compliance with ACPO requirements and is disclosable under the Freedom of Information Act 2000. It is subject to Copyright.


Copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Association of Chief Police Officers of England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Registered number: 344583: 25 Victoria Street, London. SW1H 0EX.





MOTORCYCLE ENFORCEMENT STRATEGY FOR ENGLAND, WALES & NORTHERN IRELAND

1. Introduction

In March 2000 the Government published a road safety strategy for the next 10 years, “Tomorrow’s Roads – Safer for Everyone”. This includes casualty reduction targets to be achieved by 2010. These are a 40% reduction in the number of people killed or seriously injured (KSI); a 50% reduction in the number of children killed or seriously injured; and a 10% reduction in the slight injury casualty rate.

A key factor in achieving these targets is the safety of motorcyclists. Motorcyclists represent a large proportion of road casualties in relation to their numbers. They make up around 1% of road traffic, but suffer around 18% of deaths and serious injuries.

Casualty statistics for 2004 show that powered two wheelers (PTW) deaths fell to 585 from 693 the previous year (16%) and serious injuries fell from 6,959 to 6,063 (13%). Whilst this fall in casualties is clearly positive the figures need to be balanced with the 14% increase in deaths from 2002 to 2003 and the steady climb in deaths and serious injuries over the last 10 years.

Whilst the casualty rate continues to improve, it was 25% lower in 2004 than in 1994, there is concern that motorcyclists continue to be disproportionately represented in casualty numbers. Motorcyclists are at a greater risk of death or serious injury than other road users. The relative risk of a motorcycle rider being killed or seriously injured per kilometre travelled was almost 50 times higher in 2003 than for car drivers.

In February 2005 the Department for Transport published The Government’s Motorcycling Strategy, demonstrating its commitment to supporting motorcycling as an important part of the transport mix, working together with the motorcycling community to address the needs of motorcyclists. This document also recognised that the mainstreaming of motorcycling brings with it rights and responsibilities. It states:

“Motorcyclists have the right to expect central Government to take account of motorcycling in the planning process, when designing and maintaining the road network, when managing traffic and when considering safety. In return motorcyclists must recognise their responsibilities – to ride sensibly and safely within the law, be considerate to other road users, and to others more generally – for example those who wish to enjoy the peace and tranquillity of our rural areas”

It is recognised that within the UK, Police Forces adopt many differing strategies when dealing with motorcyclists. This can result in a lack of focus on key safety issues and can lead to distrust and animosity amongst motorcyclists.

It is with this background that it has been established that there is a need for a co-ordinated approach to education, enforcement, engineering and engagement of motorcyclists. There is an opportunity to achieve this by developing a nationally agreed ‘Motorcycle Enforcement Strategy.’ This will provide an opportunity to deliver a consistent approach and to build upon best practices, share intelligence and research.

It is acknowledged that the vast majority of motorcyclists are law abiding, responsible people. There is a need to protect their interests as well as the wider public and affected communities, from the minority who choose to abuse road traffic law and endanger their lives and others. There is a need to reduce the unacceptable number of people killed and seriously injured as a result of motorcycle collisions.

2. Strategic Intention

The intention of the strategy is to focus enforcement activities on key motorcycle collision causation factors and introduce a nationally agreed approach to enforcement, with the aim of reducing killed and serious injured casualties in this most vulnerable road user group. It is recognised that some communities suffer noise intrusion and quality of life issues which need to be acknowledged and which are addressed as part of this strategy.

It is hoped that the introduction of clear guidelines will help to alleviate animosity between the Police and motorcycle groups, and will encourage an environment of co-operation and partnership, working together to achieve a safer road environment for all.

The strategy has two main objectives:

• To reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured as a result of motorcycle collisions.
• To reduce the level of anti-social behaviour associated with a small irresponsible minority of motorcyclists that disproportionately effect the quality of life for some communities.

3. Principles of enforcement

The enforcement of traffic legislation by the police should be guided by the principles of proportionality in applying the law and securing compliance.

Enforcement should be intelligence led and targeted. It needs to be consistent and transparent about what enforcement action is undertaken and why, it should recognise that effective partnership working in its broadest sense is essential. Neighbouring forces should work together to share intelligence and adopt a consistent approach to enforcement recognising that motorcyclists will frequently cross force boundaries.

There should be an emphasis on securing compliance through education, encouragement and advice, with a clear statement of intent to deal appropriately with serious and/or persistent offenders.

Pre-court interventions such as ‘Rider Improvement Schemes’ (where available) provide an opportunity to direct offenders towards formal training.

Enforcement should be proportionate to the risks to individuals, property and the degree of seriousness of the offence.

Targeting means more than simply focusing on those whose behaviour poses the greatest risk (particularly to others), or to identifiable locations or circumstances. Targeting needs to take full advantage of a wide range of information sources to properly inform, focus and prioritise enforcement activities. Effective targeting ensures that road risks are objectively identified and prioritised for appropriate action, suitable resources are deployed and pertinent monitoring and evaluation takes place. This ensures that costs and benefits can be properly assessed and future decision making enhanced.

Consistency does not mean uniformity, it does mean adopting a similar approach in similar circumstances to achieve a desired outcome. Officer discretion is a valued asset that needs to be retained and exercised under agreed guidelines. Officers observing an offence must consider the nature, severity and risk of the incident, to the perpetrator and more importantly to others before making a decision on how best to proceed. This strategy offers guidance relating to the type of offences that require intervention and options to consider for disposal. It seeks to provide a consistent approach to all road users nationally. Inconsistency in enforcement undermines public confidence and contributes to resentment and alienation.

Developing a lucid strategy assists motorcyclists and other road users to understand what is expected of them and why. It provides clarity on what the public can expect from the police and by raising awareness of the issues, develops a wider understanding of the full implications of their actions, which will facilitate changing behaviour and ultimately attitudes.

4. Core themes

• Breaches of section 2 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (Dangerous Riding) should in most cases be dealt with by way of prosecution, especially in cases where there is a victim. There is a need to deliver a clear message that behaviour constituting this offence will not be tolerated and that firm and positive action will be taken to address it.

• Breaches of section 3 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (Careless Riding), it is recommended that where this offence is committed, and there is a victim, prosecution should be the preferred option with all road users dealt with in the same manner.

The use of Section 59 Police Reform Act 2002 should also be considered. It should be noted that the primary offence of Section 3 (careless and inconsiderate riding) must have been committed with the extra elements of causing or likely to cause alarm, distress or annoyance to the public before section 59 can be implemented.

In victimless cases alternative pre-court interventions such as ‘Rider Improvement Schemes’ should be considered.

The test to be applied for careless riding is when a rider departs from the standard of riding which would be exercised by a reasonable, prudent, competent rider in all the circumstances of the particular case. This includes inappropriate speed for the vehicle or the conditions. If a persons riding falls far below that standard, charges under Section 2, Road Traffic Act 1988 should be considered.

• Exceeding speed limits, prosecution in compliance with existing detailed ACPO guidelines and individual force policies

• Breaches of section 36 of the Road Traffic Act 1988, failure to comply with road signs consider pre-court interventions.

These offences should not normally be isolated incidents, but should be accompanied by aggravating factors for example excessive speed or prolonged misuse of double white line markings.

In cases where there is a victim and/or the offences have a higher degree of ‘mens rea’ prosecution should be the preferred option.

• Registration plates, the test to be applied, if not easily legible from 20.5 metres, prosecution and inform DVLA.

Whilst accepting that this is a technical offence, there are concerns regarding the misuse of registration plates on motorcycles.

It is well recognised that there are many technological advances in automated detection and enforcement equipment, most of which rely upon remote reading of registration plates.

It is difficult for enforcement agencies to differentiate between the individual who wishes to make a fashion statement or enhance the appearance of their machine from one who is deliberately attempting to avoid detection for criminal purposes.

It is with this rationale that it has been decided not to focus on the technicalities of the size of the plate or font size to comply with current legislation, but to apply a simple test of legibility, based upon the standard eyesight test for riders and drivers.

• Illegal exhausts, in cases with no noise annoyance, consider the use of the Vehicle Defect Rectification Scheme and appropriate advice.

Where noise annoyance is a factor, prosecution is recommended, with consideration to be given to the use of Section 59 Police Reform Act 2002 for persistent offenders or excessive noise nuisance.

This issue affects the wider public and in many cases serves to alienate them from motorcyclists in general by reinforcing stereotypes. The Police have a duty to protect all road users and communities, it is therefore necessary to take proactive action against the illegal use of exhausts on motorcycles.

It is accepted that not all forces use the PNC to record and administer Section 59 warnings and seizure notices. It is recommended that the PNC should be used for this purpose

• Tinted visors, if used during daylight hours, advice only, if used during the hours of darkness or conditions of reduced visibility consider prosecution using ‘Tintman’ equipment where available.

It is acknowledged that there is much debate about this issue and many variables and anomalies can be applied. Therefore a pragmatic approach is necessary and only in cases where there is an obvious danger should prosecution be considered.

• Coloured headlamps, intervention recommended only if the light cover is red, VDRS is recommended as the primary option. Advice to be given for colours other than white.

In respect of clothing for motorcyclists there is currently no specific legislation, except for helmets, regarding the type or quality of suitable clothing that should be worn. It is therefore recommended that a common sense approach be applied, constructive and helpful advice should be offered where appropriate and that intervention and education is required in cases of obvious danger, for example, riders wearing shorts and tee shirts.

There is an underlying requirement that all of the actions listed above should be underpinned by education and advice. This should be supported by recommendation to seek further professional training.

It is recommended that where road checks are utilised care must be taken not to unnecessarily delay motorcyclists. The checks should be well resourced and focussed on specific issues. Motorcyclists should be told why they are being stopped and generalised trawling for offences is not recommended.

A high visible presence and instant intervention is more effective than covert monitoring or remote camera detection and justice by post.

Whilst this document addresses specific advice and guidance for dealing with motorcycle riders it is one strand of a number of wider road policing strategies and casualty reduction initiatives designed to achieve the Governments 2010 casualty reduction targets.

DCC David Griffin

Motorcycle casualty Reduction Working Group Lead
Humberside Police

_________________
Former Military Police Officer and accident investigator


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 23:15 
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Quote:
A high visible presence and instant intervention is more effective than covert monitoring or remote camera detection and justice by post.



plink, plink,.... the penny is dropping :lol:

_________________
Speed limit sign radio interview. TV Snap Unhappy
“It has never been the rule in this country – I hope it never will be - that suspected criminal offences must automatically be the subject of prosecution” He added that there should be a prosecution: “wherever it appears that the offence or the circumstances of its commission is or are of such a character that a prosecution in respect thereof is required in the public interest”
This approach has been endorsed by Attorney General ever since 1951. CPS Code


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 16:20 
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I didn't see much there that would reduce the KSI figures. Maybe they think that making a nuisance of themselves bikers will slow down??
Right of way violation is still the biggest and most obvious cause of motorcycle KSI's


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2006 11:10 
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Thank you Patch for the informative post.

It is important to have this sort of information to counter some of the mindless enforcement by individual officers.

Remember, always keep your cool and be politle when stopped.

It is encouraging to see that more research/publicity is being given to the accidents occuring at junctions. Size of A pillars and siting of Sat Nav devices are two points in question.

The blame is slowly being focused on driver inattention/carelessness/not looking at junctions, rather than assuming it was the bikers fault due to speed/carelessness.

This is of little comfort when you are confronted with the vehicle pulling across your path and your heart rate trebles but if the worst happens and you end up on the floor at least the reporting Police officer may be more sympathic!

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Less haste - more speed (in the right places!)


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2006 11:29 
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I wish they would apply the same type of document to policing pedestriansand cyclists (and for that matter travelers)

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Speed limit sign radio interview. TV Snap Unhappy
“It has never been the rule in this country – I hope it never will be - that suspected criminal offences must automatically be the subject of prosecution” He added that there should be a prosecution: “wherever it appears that the offence or the circumstances of its commission is or are of such a character that a prosecution in respect thereof is required in the public interest”
This approach has been endorsed by Attorney General ever since 1951. CPS Code


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2006 00:53 
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anton wrote:
I wish they would apply the same type of document to policing pedestriansand cyclists (and for that matter travelers)


Don't forget that in todays Politically correct climate ---

1) the pedestrian is always in the right place at the right time, alllothers are wrong.

2) the cyclist is also in the right place ( unless the ped is there first)

3) - Travellers are never wrong - just misunderstood

:twisted: :evil: :roll:


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