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Have you ever been bitten by a dog?
Never 33%  33%  [ 13 ]
Yes, but I didn't need medical attention 63%  63%  [ 25 ]
Yes, I visited my doctor 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Yes, I visited hospital 5%  5%  [ 2 ]
Total votes : 40
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 18:10 
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After the various discussions about 'dangerous dogs', I'm guessing that most of us have been bitten by a dog.

If you have been bitten more than once, please answer for the most serious incident only.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 21:09 
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Yes, by the family pet.

Not sure of the breed, most likely a mongrel. I do know it was a puppy and was put down afterwards. I was about 1yr old at the time.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 23:23 
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I've been bitten by my own dog, but only after much provatation. Add to that kicked by cows, oh and troddern on too. Been hammered against a wall by a very irate freshly calved cow. Attacked by freshly farrowed pigs (they bring their mates to help). Sheep have very hard heads too and had a few run ins with horsey birds....


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 23:53 
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Anyone bitten a dog? :)

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 23:59 
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I was bitten across my forehead by a neighbour's dog when I was only 5 years old, (no medical treatment needed). My own fault, I was teasing and provoking before it struck. Can't remember the breed, think it was just a random mongrel. I also recall that when I went home in tears to my parents' I just got a bollocking for winding up the dog and that was the end of the matter.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 00:03 
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Got 3 dogs. A golden Retriever and two cocker spaniels. Never been bitten. Even though they all have a mild manner I would NEVER alow them near children unsupervised.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 02:00 
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When I was about twelve years old

I was sitting in my step grandads house watching the TV, his Boston Terrier (looks like a Boxer but is the size of a Rat) ran into the room, jumped on my lap and bit my face, effectively removing the end of my nose.

I needed hospital treatment, the flesh was hanging by a thread and it was surtured back into place using about twelve stitches. I still have the scar thirty years later.

The dog was not destroyed, my mum had only recently married my step dad and no one wanted to upset the "balance" and my new Grand parents refused to accept that I had not been responsible at least in part, which I hadn't.

The dog later bit another child not connected to the family and met its fate at the end of a needle, my mother has never really got over the fact that she didn't stand up for me at the time and insist the dog was dangerous. The upside is that her and my stepdad are still married so I guess it was all worth it.

We have had three dogs since Mrs Patch and I have been married, one I had put down as it was untrainable. We had one who grew old with us and was about 10 when our children arrived, she was a placid thing but as the athiritus grew bad, her temperament towards the children was questionable, she was never left alone with them, to do so would have (IMHO) have constituted child neglect.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 02:02 
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malcolmw wrote:
Anyone bitten a dog? :)


Actually yes.

Our Golden retriever (mentioned earlier as growing old with us) was a bit of a handful when we got her and she bared her teeth at me as a pup. I bit her neck and wresled her to the floor as I did it, never had any trouble after that as she had learned her place in the pack.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 09:54 
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Yes. Twice. Both times by a Jack Russell and both times because the owners didn't properly control animals they knew were "snappy". The second incident "takes the biscuit"!

I've always had at least one dog in the family and currently have a lab. When she was young, we took her to obedience classes. I was sat down at the end of the hall with my dog next to me when a woman with a Jack Russell took the seat next to me. I spoke to the woman when the JR lunged at me and took the skin off one of my knuckles. At that point, the woman revealed that she was taking the dog to obedience classes to teach it "social skills". IIRC I swore and mentioned something about it being a good idea to warn people because an obedience class is not a place you expect to find dangerous dogs.

On the other side of the coin, some people invite being bitten. I'm appalled by the number of mothers who know neither me nor my dog but without a by or leave tell their progeny to stroke the "nice doggie". I usually respond with a terse command of "leave it", addressed just as much to the mother and child as to my dog. The way that many children approach a dog is completely wrong - and something the dog might interpret as aggression. My dog is a sweetie, but some dogs will defend themselves when approached like that. When I mentioned this to one mum, she accused me of having a dangerous dog and threatened to have it put down :roll:

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 11:30 
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I was nipped by our own dog a few times, probably deserved it.

I've been bitten harder by my own children, I'm not going to have them put down though.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 17:27 
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Been bitten once by one of my family's many bulldogs as a child, but I deserved it (what do they say about letting sleeping dog's lie?).

Having a bulldog myself, I'm vaguely worried that the dangerous dogs panic at the moment will end up encompassing all bull-breeds.

Bosley is soft as butter, but again I would never leave him alone with children. In his case he would be more likely to hurt a child through overexuberant playing than malice, but the result's the same.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 17:48 
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I'm not a dog person, I much prefer cats, for a multitude of reasons. However, when I was nipped by a friend's dog when I was younger, I would have been distraught and mortified if it had been put down as a result!

I'm not saying don't destroy dangerous dogs, in fact, I'm not saying much of anything, other than that the circumstances should always be taken into account before putting a dog to sleep (god that phrase creeps me out) merely for clashing with a human.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 17:57 
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RobinXe wrote:
I'm not saying don't destroy dangerous dogs, in fact, I'm not saying much of anything, other than that the circumstances should always be taken into account before putting a dog to sleep (god that phrase creeps me out) merely for clashing with a human.


I agree there in part. I think there is a major distinction between being bitten and being mawled to death though.

BTW I've had worse bites / scratches from cats than dogs.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 09:53 
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I was nipped by one of my dogs when he was a pup - I bit the bugger back and he has never done it again.

Its the media hype that gets up my nose. You get people looking all scared when you are out walking your dogs because of the hype. My two are always on a lead, and fully under control. They are not exactly what you consider to be dangerous dogs, a briard and a border collie.

That said, children should always be supervised around any kind of animal, and I agree with what has been said by other posters about childen being told to stroke the nice doggy. If any kids come up to my dogs, I tell them to stop, and say that they should always ask the dog owner if its OK to stroke their dog. I also show them the correct way of greeting a dog by holding your hand for them to sniff, palm facing down and away from the dog so they do not percieve a threat.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 19:48 
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hmm, Jack Russells are getting some flack on here... They are a very energetic little dog, kind of a Dog GTi, if you will. Mine didn't get to go into town much, becuase he had his own farm to scamper 'round, but when he did he was the very model of good behaviour. 'cos he was an attractive little chap, little girls would come up and ask to stroke him. He viewed this in the same way as a pop star that signs autographs when he doesn't reaslly want to, but does to keep the fans happy :lol:

As for Border Collies, gotta be carefull with a dog that is that intelligent and could run a marathon every day.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 00:31 
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My parents had three German Shepherds, and I never got bitten by any of them.
I once bit the nose of one, as it tried to find it's way under my duvet :roll: and he never tried it again!

When I used to take him to the pub, many people would urge him to "kill" or mutter "rabbits" under their breath, but he was never trained to respond to those commands.
"Pirates" was his command to defend against strangers - aggressive barking, but never biting, and to chase something/someone, we used "bagpuss" which was a cuddly toy we would hide in our pockets and have hime search for.
When you said "Bagpuss", he assumed the target you indicated had the toy and would give chase - people, cars, cyclists - anything you cared to point at!! :wink:
None of our dogs was ever afraid of fireworks - so I am puzzled as to why some dogs seem petrified according to reports - I've never seen one in a funk because of them, yet if our local paper is to be believed, dozens of dogs and horses go into fits at the slightest bang, and most of the horses around here spontaneously abort at the first sign of a rocket.
Anyone else noticed this?

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 01:40 
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My old retriever cross used to get well excited on firework night. Maybe thats cause when she was a pup she used to have her happiest hours with me on the rifle range as I took new recruits for their shooting practice.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 03:37 
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Judging from the standard of shooting I see from the scuffers these days Patch, your pup ought to have been terrified ;)


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