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You judge instinctively a given speed "X" is safe enough that you could slow or swerve to avoid anyone emerging. Do you:
... slow to "X" several seconds before the junction and then carry on at that speed (modifying again of course if needs arise). 15%  15%  [ 2 ]
... lift off and cover/feather the brake, aiming to slow to "X" pretty much as you arrive at the junction, transferring back to the throttle only when you know it is safe to pass the junction (or when past it). 62%  62%  [ 8 ]
do something else (please post what). 23%  23%  [ 3 ]
Total votes : 13
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 15:17 
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A situation that must occur in most people's travels daily:

You're on a single carriageway road, have right of way over roads joining it, with sufficient distance in front of you to be able to go fast or slow (forgetting posted limits for the moment). You have sped up having got to a straight section with either no junctions on it or those that exist are clearly clear. You are now approaching a junction with traffic either waiting to emerge or approaching on ther minor road and will arrive at the junction around the time or just before you expect to.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 17:18 
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I voted 'do something else'.

On the bike in this situation I'd do a combination of 1 and 2. Roll off the gas early to allow me to reduce speed to X before reaching the junction and then maintain that speed while covering the brakes. This gives me best control of the bike (on the gas) but the most options if the person at the junction decides to pull out - I can either accelerate or brake depending on what they do and when.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 17:59 
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I happily answered [2] when I first read it, confident that I was describing my behaviour. But on deeper consideration, I think I actually do something entirely different. It's more dynamic...

Hopefully I've been able to see the potential for hazard from a long way back. Let's call it 500 yards and I'm doing 60mph. At this distance I probably do nothing - not even lift off. After all there remains a significant possibility that the hazard will have gone when I get there.

As I get closer, I'm continually assessing the hazard and revising any value I might have for X. But I'm also very definitely retaining the option to stop completely if the hazard worsens.

When I get to about 500ft, I'm probably starting to brake. From this distance I very much have the option of braking gently to a stop at the hazard. But I'm still continually assessing the hazard. Possibly the hazard might lessen and my speed might be OK. Possibly the hazard might worsen and I'd continue to brake.

At some point my speed is low enough. And I continue. Then the opportunity to brake passes (i.e. we're too close) then we're past and accelerating again.

I'll also admit to being prepared to drive past an occupied junction at 60mph in good conditions - if and only if nothing set off my alarm bells.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 18:17 
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I suppose the options are pretty high depending on the initial risk assessment, and how the situation develops on the approach.

On a bike, we may have the additional benefit of being able to move significantly away from the hazard.

Sometimes, I cover my horn as well as the brake if it all looks a bit dodgy.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 18:26 
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I think this question is too complex for a poll which generally is only useful where it allows choice between a small number of clear alternatives.

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The views expressed in this post are personal opinions and do not represent the views of Safespeed.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 19:10 
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Thanks to all respondents. I was principally thinking of a car and would likely behave differently on a bike.

I think also I do what Paul does - which I also think simplifies (almost) to [2].


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 05:28 
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I use my left foot on the brake, and my right foot on the gas. Since I have never owned a car with a manual transmission, I trained my left foot to use the brake exclusively.
Before closing in on the intersection, I stay in the throttle, downshift, and then either relax the throttle, or brake if need be. Once past the point of no return, being in a lower gear allows me to clear the intersection more quickly when I get back on the gas.

I can't wait until all dryfriction clutch transmissions obsolesce torque converters and become automatics themselves, like VW/Audi's DSG or Mitsu's SST.

I wonder how that will change other drivers' styles ...

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3) The Laws of Physics are invincible and immutable - so-called 'laws' of men are not
4) You are always immediately and ultimately responsible for your safety first, then proximately responsible for everyone's
Do not let other road users' mistakes become yours, nor yours become others
5) The rest, including laws of the land, is thoughtful observation, prescience, etiquette, decorum, and cooperation


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