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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2005 21:05 
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Cycle craft :lol: :lol:


For the benefit of new cyclists, returning cyclists and to set thing straight with our C plus critics who quote “Cycle Craft,” :wink: I am going to mention one of two gems from my well read and now tatty copy. :lol: It may encourage some of those over the road to actually read it again. I drive a car well – yet still re-read Road Craft and the Highway Code. I consider I am fairly skilled o n a bike – but as with my car, I read the expert advice again and have a hard think with a view to improve at all times. :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink:

Only a complacent idiot “knows it all” :roll: and these are the one who invariably have and C AUSE accidents :roll: - like the bad overtake from a car driver yesterday. I had slowed for a horse approaching me and this idiot nearly caused a major – as did the cyclist who never slowed for an unmarked crossroads…:furious:

On page 26, John Franklin says:


Quote:
“Listening is an essential skill for understanding what’s going on around you. 8-) Here a cyclist has an advantage 8-) over the motorist, as sounds are not muted with the inner comfort of a car. You ears should be active all the time – listening our for car acceleration, change of pitch in a car engine and if you wear a hat of helmets - make sure your ears are not covered. Good hearing is vital for a cyclist. “ :wink:



Hmmm- wonder what would happen if Franklin posted this on a certain web site….

On page 29 Franklin says

Quote:
“For a skilled cyclist crashes are rare. But even so a prudent cyclist is prepared for a crash. In the case of a collisions a cyclist will be thrown into the air and the biggest danger here to his head” Be prepared to try to control the orientation of your body”


I seem to remember Kriss getting hammered for saying the same thing when she said this and the reaction was “troll”. Well – perhaps partially because of talking car as well – but not when she talked “bike”.

On page 41, Franklin suggests cars and bikes mix very well for the most part. He talks of being at ease :wink: on the bike and “reading the road,” I have said this on here /IG said it Wildy neko: :lol: is always saying it. As have all family members on any forum they post to. :wink: Franklin suggests s understanding other drivers – sounds like a part of COAST to me.

He suggests being aware of rights and responsibilities and not to encourage other s to make mistakes. 8-)

On page 43 he reminds in much the same way as Road and Motorbike Craft, Paul Ripley, IAM and Paul Smith :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: – not to get annoyed by others – accept the mistakes and take control of the situation by PLANNINGT (sounds like C O A ST again). :wink: :lol: 8-) :D

He warns :wink: :oops: :x against riding with superior smugness too and lunging at cars and kicking them as advocated by a certain person on C+ (NOTE I SAY PERSON and C+; lurkers you know well who I may mean here.) :x :evil: :x :evil: :x
On page 43 – he says cyclists are too submissive and feel they must allow priority to drivers – he’s really telling to to plan and apply C O A S T here =- concentrate, observe, anticipate and PLAN reaction (OIN page 42 – he calls tihis Judgement. :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: It's the same thing - be HONEST! :wink: :D :)


On page 51


Quote:
“Thinking ahead and planning ahead is the hallmark of a skilled cyclists

The purpose of observation is to give you time to react to any hazard whether actual or potential danger


.
CO A ST :wink: :wink: :lol:

I dare some of those people who made some silly comments over the road to dare criticise this. This is on page 52 a Cycle Craft. If anyone dares challenge this – then I will simply reply that they have not read this book and thus are not really true cyclists or drivers even.

On page 62- the book gives advice on cornering and this advice mirrors Ian and IG on the subject. 8-) 8-) 8-)

This books though – a must readwhether you cycle or not. A lot of good sense and Franklin says a good deal of common sense in his book on tips for adult cyclists.
8-)

But crtics - suggest you wash mouths out wiht soap. We are right and you are WRONG! :D :D :D Even your hero Frankin backs us up:!wink:



There are lot more gems from Cycle Craft/. John Frankin would appear to agree with mos who post to this site and he does appear to say many things which Paul Smith has posted on here, on C+ and elsewhere too

.. Some people do forget - some of us enjoy LIFE - and enjoy sex, comuters, kids, cooking, the interner, driving, walking, cycling nd we are certainly not suggewting a free for all either. :wink:

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2005 22:31 
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I have clearly stepped into a parallel universe, I don't understand any of this :?
Sorry
RJ

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 19:35 
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Don't worry Rod, it's quite confusing for those not-used to MMs particular posting style. Persevere and he generally has some good advice, you just have to filter out the C+ references, sometimes I get the impression he doesn't like the 'other' forum!

:wink:


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 20:36 
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Rod - I think the Mad Doc is trying to draw our attention to the fact that Cycle Craft is very similar to Road Craft and Motorbike Craft by offering very similar advice regarding Concentration, Observation, Anticipation and planning by allowing Space and Time :wink: :lol:

My copy is also a well thumbed copy :) and on page 51, we have some very, very familiar advice - as seen on Paul's main pages and within many threads throught the forum sections. :lol:

I cannot resist typing this from CycleCraft :twisted: It is almost identical to RoadCraft and is basically C O A S T advice :wink:

I hope the following quote will inspire debate and comment from drivers and cyclists on site - and may encourage safespeed "critics" to join in the discussion here. (Cyclists do seem to be the most vocal group pro- speed cameras :wink: but if they really read Cycle Craft and the top tips into practices .... :wink: :wink: :wink: :boxedin: :twisted: :stirthepot:)



CycleCraft wrote:

Thinking ahead and planning every move is essential to each cyclist. For this good observation. If you cannot see and read what is going on - in front, to your sides and behind - it will be impossible for you to plan the safest and fastest :shock: manoeuvre in any situation


:scratchchin: But that's what we've been saying all along .... :wink: :P

Cycle Craft wrote:

For a cyclist observation is not just about seeing - it is about hearing. Many vital clues are assimilated by ears


:scratchchin: Compare this with the thread in which I spell out C O A S T :wink: - only I also suggest using your noses and reflections in shop windows and anything which gives a useful clue about hazard potential. :wink:

CycleCraft wrote:

The purpose of observation is to give you time to react to any hazard, whether it be actual or potential danger. Because of this need for [i]reaction time , the degree of concentration necessary is proportional to the complexity of the traffic and the situation around you - volume and speed of traffic .


Sounds awfully like COAST to me and Paul's thread posted way back in the past to both this site and the cycling site about "taking control of the traffic situation around you!" :wink:

But this is not us saying this - it is John Franklin :surprise: who wrote the "Bible" of safe cycling! :wink: :o :shock: :D :wink:




Cycle Craft wrote:

Although you should always adjust your speed so that you can adequately observe the coditions around you, as a cyclist the level of concentration will usually depend more on the speed of others than your own speed You should also realise that as your speed increases - you as a cyclist will have to concetrate all the harder on the situation further ahead and the foreground will become less distinct. Also bear in mind that you will need a greater stopping distance for a given speed than a driver.


This last point is something which I really fear a large number of cyclists - novices and seasoned alike - simply FAIL to understand - and may be one reason why the KSI amongst our cyclists has increased nationally when all other KSI have reduced. :? :cry: :? :( :cry: . Just because your bike is slower than a car - many think they are able to stop in time. Nope. Sorry - but where car braking systems have advanced - bike brakes are just the same as ever... believe me - I ride a top of the range Trek and a top of the range Raleigh amongst other bikes :lol: - and whilst the gears have developed and improved- I cannot - really cannot - give the same seal of approval to braking system. :x But again - it is knowing your bike and its handling ... :wink:

Cycle Craft wrote:

Local knowledge can help considerably in anticipating problems - but equally familiarity can lead to loss of concentration and a false sense of security


Again - it echoes everything posted by all motorists on this site :wink:

Cycle Craft wrote:

When riding along look as far ahead as possible - keeping your surveillance two-three cars ahead :wink: Observe the obvious: vehicles turning into and from your road, approacch of junctions, driver signals - but do not rely on them 100% :lol: :lol: Always look for a another signal -such as a reduction in speed or change of direction or position


Um - I think we are familiar ground here :wink: Still C O A ST in other wording though :wink:

Cycle Craft wrote:

Observe small details whoich give vital clues to the less obvious:

[i] the presence of people in parked cars - they may open a door



:scratchchin: Paul posted similar ages ago... :wink: when this was up for discussion amongst drivers :wink:

Cycling Craft wrote:

Exhaust fumes from a stationary car - it may just set off!

Passengers moving on a bus - it may set off!

The last passenger on a bus ....


And he goes on to warn of the same items I have mentioned in the driving section - to look out for parked cars, buses, delivery vans, taxis, and he even talks of looking the direction wheels are pointing in and looking dorectly in the face of another road user to establish intention.

It's still C O A S T regardless of how some people wish to argue... :wink: :wink: :lol:

The book is a must read for all really.

However, I am going to look at certain topics which present a danger to drivers and cyclists alike and post up in manner to try to strimulate and initiate discussiion rather than just quote the book :wink:

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 22:20 
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In Gear wrote:
whilst the gears have developed and improved- I cannot - really cannot - give the same seal of approval to braking system.

not much can be done there as the tyres (or lack of) are the limiting factor in an emergency stop.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 22:22 
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Rod, just for future reference, In Gear is from the same stable, but then you'd probably realised that. The liberal use of emoticons, quotes and COAST references tends to be a bit of a giveaway with this lot!

Oh yeah, and the general similar outlook on C+ users!

:wink:

They love it really!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 23:20 
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Peyote wrote:
Rod, just for future reference, In Gear is from the same stable, but then you'd probably realised that. The liberal use of emoticons, quotes and COAST references tends to be a bit of a giveaway with this lot!

Oh yeah, and the general similar outlook on C+ users!

:wink:

They love it really!



:lol:

We like our emoticons! :D 8-) :twisted: 8-) :whip:

They are cutest little guys! :twisted: Und they help get across message we hope - if we use them nicely... :P But I wind up with the over use here ... :? 8-) :lol: :twisted:

Und COAST - ist a good easy to remember message und sums up Cycle Craft, Road Craft , IAM books, AA expert driver, DSA "Driving Essentials Book, Ripley, Lyons und Highway Code in one little word - und we also drive und ride to the COAST :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Und we like teasing people :twisted: :twisted: :twisted: :twisted: :evil: :twisted: :shock: :surprise:

Unfortunately - we are large family ... ist danger of Catholic upbringing... :wink: und we have no control over family members .... :roll: und am not so much Wildy :neko: as playful sexy kitten :wink: IG ist cousin - UK born und bred und has BiB written all over him! :P Mad Doc ist stubborn Yorkshire man und made worse by mixing with the Appenzeller riff raff! :lol: who are also known for being "difficult to win argument with" :wink:

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 20:34 
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Thank you all for your valiant effort to explain the forgoing, I will just have to work at it.
RJ

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 22:55 
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In Gear wrote

Quote:
Nope. Sorry - but where car braking systems have advanced - bike brakes are just the same as ever... believe me - I ride a top of the range Trek and a top of the range Raleigh amongst other bikes - and whilst the gears have developed and improved- I cannot - really cannot - give the same seal of approval to braking system.


Maybe on road bikes which I assume your Trek & Raleigh are (Dynatech by any chance?), where you are still reliant on rubbing bits of rubber against the rims & virtually no tyre/road contact area. But most high end MTB's have hydraulic disc brakes (not the crappy cable ones) with up to 6 pots & a 205mm disc. (eg. Hope mono6ti) These have phenominal stopping power, wet or dry. Tyres are just as advanced with specific tread patterns to remain rigid or flex, giving great ground contact. Combine that with decent suspension & adjusting your body position & then ridiculous stopping distances can be achieved in the dry. Mind you ALL of the stopping is done with the front. Loading the weight just right to almost lift the rear wheel. 20 to 0 can be done in about as many feet! The advancements are there, just limited by the application. A 'roadie' won't want 3 or 4 lbs of braking system hanging off the frame! And the 'V' style brakes most commonly found on MTB's & tourers can, if misused apply forces cabable of cracking / deforming carbon rims & thin alloys - hence the propencity for ye olde calipers I would think.

ABS type systems were tried out for bikes - but abandoned because they didn't work (cams of the leading edges of brake pads).

The hazards of turning, not always under heavy braking, in the wet (oily road surface) is not something technology will ever erradicate, it has seen me face plant a few times. Smashed front teeth twice!.....But I'm not complaining.... that was done over 12 years ago (More careful after that). Come to think of it, there must have been 5 or 6 in the cycling club / race team with crowns & implants.... :lol:


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