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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2005 13:41 
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Brakes


Whatever type of bike and handlebar style etc you have - check the left lever operates the rear brake and the right hand lever operates the front brakes! As with cars – brake block wear and the cables stretch New ones squeal :oops: a bit and as with cars they need to “bed” a bit. So take care and make sure you replaced the correct one for your type of wheel (once attended a serious nasty where the deceased had used a leather faced block on alloys and had positioned the blocks incorrectly as well. Your blocks should be set so that they operate with a small movement of the levers (your levers should never come near the handle bars even in an emergency! Your blocks should normally clear the wheel rims.

Check out the brake cables – especially the end nipples which are hidden within the brake levers as this is where your cables normally fray and brake. Every now and then grease it and greasing the cable wire inside the outer sleeves can also reduce friction. Remember - if you have to brake hard – inspect your cable for any damage immediately. :idea:

Gears

Very valuable to get the best out of a ride! These match your power output to the energy requirements of the bike which depends on gradient and acceleration A good range of gears is essential – but sadly a large number do not know how to use them – and a call to the CTC will tell you where you can have one hour’s tuition for a modest fee in your local area. :wink:

I have to recommend anyone usnsure of using gears does seek a course. :wink: Correct adjustment of gears is important for road safety as gear changing in traffic has to be quick and precise. Please ensure you can engage all usable gears easily and reliably without the chain falling off With derailleur gears in particular there is usually an overlap of gears and this can lead to problems of chain rubbing for some. :shock: :?

Tramsission

Moving parts need cleaning and lubrication – rule is little and often – but do not lubricate brakes and gear levers. However, it is vital that the transmission system is well maintained - relubricate thechain each time it gets wet. Again lot of accidents are caused because the cyclist does not lubricate or inspect the chain for wear and tear . :? :shock: :(

Check the chain by pulling the chain away from the front of the largest chain wheel with your hand if it moves more than the heigh of a tooth – it needs replacing. You may also have to change the sprockets as well as new chains and old sprockets

Also look for play around the bottom bracket. Grasp each pedal in turn and try to rock it for side to side – If there is any significant movement - - there is a loose pedal, crank or bottom bracket. Spin the pedals and cranks backwards – if there is any opposition – overtight bearing

Headset

Check the tightness of the headset. Handlebars should turn without any friction – but not too loose that bearings jar. Hold the front brake and rock the bike back and forth. Movement should be restricted to that caused by the give of the tyres and you should not notice any movement between the front fork and the frame. A tight or loose headster leads to wobbles at speed and excessively wears the headset cups and bearings. We had one major incident last year through a poorly maintained headset – and the guy had severe head injuries as a result of the fall. :cry:

Tyres

As with cars – worn tyres puncture easily and do not grip the road. As with your car – please make sure you have the correct pressure. Over-inflated bike tyres can explode and under inflated tyres as with cars – makes steering heavy, difficult and potentially lethal

Buy a pressure gauge – you should find the maxium pressure on the tyre wall of your bike. It’s usually 70-90 pounds per square inch. psi)


:lol: Finally - do wear a decent helmet, ensure your lights work, keep spare batteries and wear something which makes you easily seen and spottable in the dark. The numpty brigade, alas.... :roll:
:wink:

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2005 15:26 
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In Gear wrote:
Buy a pressure gauge – you should find the maxium pressure on the tyre wall of your bike. It’s usually 70-90 pounds per square inch. psi)

unless you're using a road bike and then it's usually 90-120 for clinchers and anything up to 220 for singles (ok, so you wouldn't use these on a road). For my daily ride I normally run 100psi. Hybrids use similar wheels/tyres so pressures are about the same.

Quote:
check the left lever operates the rear brake and the right hand lever operates the front brakes

in some countries the default is to set them up the other way around!


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 2005 02:05 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 18:39
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johnsher wrote:
In Gear wrote:
Buy a pressure gauge – you should find the maxium pressure on the tyre wall of your bike. It’s usually 70-90 pounds per square inch. psi)
Quote:
unless you're using a road bike and then it's usually 90-120 for clinchers and anything up to 220 for singles (ok, so you wouldn't use these on a road). For my daily ride I normally run 100psi. Hybrids use similar wheels/tyres so pressures are about the same.


Quote:
As with cars – brake block wear and the cables stretch New ones squeal a bit and as with cars they need to “bed” a bit.


It is extemely important to get this right. Too low is just as bad as too high. 60 psi is about the recomended max in a 'fat' MTB style tyre. Put 150psi in and you'll blow it off the rim! (BIG bang).

Handy Hint

New brake blocks squealing can be significantly reduced if you set them up correctly with around 1-2mm 'toe-in'. When installing new pads/blocks slip a temporary spacer (eg. 5p coin) just at the TRAILING rear edges of the block NOT the front instead of setting it just flat against the rim. This prevents the worst squealing, which is caused by vibrations. Try it, it works. This is standard practice in cycle repair workshops. Also, as already noted, DO NOT buy leather faced blocks - these were for steel rims only, buy a quality compound - your life depends on these - not 99p black rubber junk!


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